ProbablyWriting

Apr 16

“Every morning in Africa, a gazelle wakes up, it knows it must outrun the fastest lion or it will be killed. Every morning in Africa, a lion wakes up. It knows it must run faster than the slowest gazelle, or it will starve. It doesn’t matter whether you’re the lion or a gazelle — when the sun comes up, you’d better be running.” — Abe Gubegna (via turkeylink)

(Source: looksbrainswildcard, via turkeylink)

[video]

[video]

soloses:

the a in lgbtqa should stand for allies, they deserve the recognition for defeating the axis powers and winning world war 2

(via let--me--sing)

sourpatchsaint:

here’s the thing about that vegan post. i’m a pescatarian. i was a vegetarian for 17 years of my life (i’m 22) and i started eating fish because i needed to change my diet. i have never had beef, pork, and i have had chicken broth a few times. i personally believe that we should encourage less meat consumption in society (public school lunches) however, that is a luxury that not everyone can afford. i come from a very middle class family. i have never thought that my mother couldn’t put food on the table. i have never gone to sleep hungry. i have never feared that i couldn’t afford to eat lunch at school. I AM LUCKY. I AM PRIVILEGED. NOT EVERYONE ELSE IS. i love animal rights and i am all for setting a more sustainable/ethical dietary standard, but its time to stop pretending that everyone who eats cheap, non-vegan/vegetarian food does it because its their #1 choice. IF YOU WANT PEOPLE TO CONSIDER VEGAN/VEGETARIAN FOOD, START TALKING ABOUT ECONOMIC DISPARITY AND FOOD DESERTS. it breaks my heart that animals are mistreated for our food, but it fucking kills me that some feel that they have the ability to judge other humans who can’t afford to live the same high-brow, healthy, ~ethical~ lifestyle. THINK ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE. not everybody can afford to raid trader joes for expensive fake cheese.

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

(via rebelle-epoque)

(Source: shakespearememes, via williamshakespearethings)

stfueverything:

brundle-bambi:

grrspit:

zenodotus5:

cognitivedissonance:

brooklynmutt:

Now on your restaurant bill: Obamacare fee

I’m fine with this. If it means said place is complying with the ACA instead of trying to get around it by kicking their employees on to the exchanges via cutting hours to part-time, great. Here’s two dimes.

Twenty cents for a bill of over $20. So that employees get health insurance. This is a fucking ADVERTISEMENT for Obamacare.

^^^
No lie. 

You’re willing to pay 2.50 for an iced tea and 6.50 for a hot dog and yet you bitch about .20 going to give employees health coverage? Get outta my face.

^^^^priorities

stfueverything:

brundle-bambi:

grrspit:

zenodotus5:

cognitivedissonance:

brooklynmutt:

Now on your restaurant bill: Obamacare fee

I’m fine with this. If it means said place is complying with the ACA instead of trying to get around it by kicking their employees on to the exchanges via cutting hours to part-time, great. Here’s two dimes.

Twenty cents for a bill of over $20. So that employees get health insurance. This is a fucking ADVERTISEMENT for Obamacare.

^^^

No lie. 

You’re willing to pay 2.50 for an iced tea and 6.50 for a hot dog and yet you bitch about .20 going to give employees health coverage? Get outta my face.

^^^^priorities

cartoonpolitics:

references assertions in the news that for every dollar paid to men in the USA, women earn only $0.77. In the case of  African American women that drops to $0.66 and for Hispanic women $0.58… (some background here)

cartoonpolitics:

references assertions in the news that for every dollar paid to men in the USA, women earn only $0.77. In the case of  African American women that drops to $0.66 and for Hispanic women $0.58… (some background here)

(via rebelle-epoque)

[video]